Massimo Pupillo

1969
Osita, Italy

Massimo Pupillo is well known as a bassist for the jazzcore band Zu, but his musical career includes Germanotta YouthBlack EngineDogonGebbia, Ligeti, Pupillo (these four all onWallace Records), ArdecoreEvolve (with FM Einheit of Einsturzende Neubauten),OffOnOff (with Terrie Ex of band The Ex), Original Silence (Thurston Moore from Sonic YouthJim O’Rourke and Mats Gustafsson) in addition to regular collaborations with Stephen O’Malley (Sunn O)))) and the father of european free jazz, Peter Brotzmann.

Phonometak Series #7

wal123
Phonometak Series 7
January, 2010
10inch LP
2 tracks
20 minutes

On Fillmore: Formed in the Summer of 2000, after performing together with Jim O’Rourke, acoustic upright bass and percussion duo On Fillmore creates original music that incorporates field recordings. Bassist Darin Gray(Dazzling KillmenBrise-GlaceYona-KitYou Fantastic!Grand Ulena, Bobby ConnCheer Accident)and drummer Glenn Kotche (Wilco). Their sound takes the listener to exotic sonic locations – both real and imagined – resulting in music that is peerless in contemporary composition.

Massimo Pupillo, Uchihashi Kazuhisa , Yasuhiro Yoshigaki:
Massimo Pupillo
is well known as a bassist for the jazzcore band Zu, but his musical career includesGermanotta YouthBlack EngineDogonGebbia, Ligeti, Pupillo (these four all onWallace Records), ArdecoreEvolve (with FM Einheit of Einsturzende Neubauten),OffOnOff (with Terrie Ex of band The Ex), Original Silence (Thurston Moore from Sonic YouthJim O’Rourke and Mats Gustafsson) in addition to regular collaborations with Stephen O’Malley (Sunn O)))) and the father of european free jazz, Peter Brotzmann.

Yasuhiro Yoshigaki was born in Hyogo in 1959. While a university student, he started performing on the Kansai (western Japan) jazz scene. Following stints as leader of various groups, including a Kansai salsa band and an improvisational music ensemble, he founded the bands Altered States and Sights. Yoshigaki played in such groups as Modern Chokichokis, Otomo Yoshihide’sGround-ZeroShibusashirazu. He also performs and records with artists in many other genres, in addition, he’s participated in the Tokyo and Kyoto Operations of John Zorn‘s Cobra; and in music production for theater and films by Shinji Somai, Christopher Doyle, and others.

Kazuhisa Uchihashi is a Japanese guitarist involved in free improvisation music. Born in 1959 in Osaka, Uchihashi began to play the guitar at age 12, playing in various rock bands, though he later studied jazz music. In 1988 he joined the band the First Edition, and in 1990 formed the bandAltered States. He was also a member of Otomo Yoshihide’s Ground Zero from 1994 to 1997. Uchihashi also plays daxophone, and in addition to his role as a free improviser, Uchihashi has been the musical director for Osaka theatre group Ishinha, has held improvisation workshops in various cities in Japan, as well as London, and has set up his own record label, Innocent Records, had held music festival from 1996 Festival Beyond Innocence annual for eleven years.

 

The Williamsburg Sonatas

wal055
January, 2005
CD
8 tracks
41 minutes

Lukas Ligeti’s background encompasses jazz, avant-rock, and contemporary composition, and he eases that experience into his playing. Massimo Pupillo is an electric bassist with the Italian noise rock band Zu who has collaborated with everyone from avant folkie Eugene Chadbourne to former Can singer Damo Suzuki, not to mention Chicago reedist Ken Vandermark. Luckily his baggage here includes the rhythm, but not the stultifying beat of pop music. Meanwhile, Sicilian alto saxophonist Gianni Gebbia is a free jazz player who adapts the musical sounds of the Mediterranean to his work with his own bands and alliances advanced with fellow improvisers in locales such as California’s San Francisco Bay area. Working in a style that draws from Ornette Coleman as well as seaside balladeers, the alto saxophonist invests these tunes with techniques that range from tongue stops and altissimo smears to pitch-vibrated growls and smeared flutter tonguing. Ligeti’s accompaniment encompasses ruffs, bounces, strokes and drags. He can sound a backbeat as well as any rocker; introduce unique timbres from drum tops, claves and wood blocks that relate to the beats advanced from so-called primordial players; or alter stick-on-stick pulses and rim shots to resemble the inventions of musique concrète. And ranging from R&B-style thumb pops, claw-hammer frailing, rhythmic strums and jazzy fills, Pupillo’s electric bass style provides whatever pulse is necessary for each tune. Somehow he’s capable of producing arco-like wave forms, but as a rule he mostly confides himself to timekeeping, allowing the other two foreground freedom. Making the most of this, the saxophonist undulates straight lines, squeals with glottal punctuation, pushes almost-inaudible air through his bell, and negotiates unvarying tongue stops. Climax comes with the almost ten-minute “Some Disordered Interior Geometrics.” With the bassist holding straight to the center with ringing tones, the piece unrolls in a welter of surging sax lines and cross-patterning from the percussion. Briefly straying into ethnic music, Pupillo sounds timbres that could come from a lotar or Berber lute, and Gebbia completes the incursion in similar non-Western fashion. Expelling snaky obbligatos and tongue slaps at the same time, he manages to express the exposition and its development simultaneously. With more use of the location than the sonata’s classic form, the three have managed to produce a memorable recording.
Ken Waxman, All About Jazz